<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Feb 27, 2017 at 4:30 PM, Darren Cook <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:darren@dcook.org" target="_blank">darren@dcook.org</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><span class="gmail-">> But those video games have a very simple optimal policy. Consider Super Mario:<br>
> if you see an enemy, step on it; if you see a whole, jump over it; if you see a<br>
> pipe sticking up, also jump over it; etc.<br>
<br>
</span>A bit like go? If you see an unsettled group, make it live. If you have<br>
a ko, play a ko threat. If you see have two 1-eye groups near each<br>
other, join them together. :-)<br>
<br>
Okay, those could be considered higher-level concepts, but I still<br>
thought it was impressive to learn to play arcade games with no hints at<br>
all.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>The impressive part is hidden in what most humans consider trivial; to make the programs 'see'</div><div><br></div><div>Erik</div><div><br></div></div></div></div>