<div class="gmail_quote"><div><br></div><div>Thanks Brian for this comment:</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div lang="EN-US" link="blue" vlink="purple">

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#1f497d">1) It is very important to limit the number of parameters concurrently optimized. E.g., to 4 or fewer. The optimum might be 3. </span></p>

</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I do something similar (with other optimization algorithms); in large dimension, I optimize only a few parameters,</div><div>and then I slowly add new parameters. A little bit like Sieves method in statistics. </div>

<div>I try to mathematically justify this process, which is not that much documented in noisy optimization papers and which</div><div>might be a good optimization trick...</div><div><br></div><div>Best regards,</div><div>

Olivier</div><div><br></div></div>