This has been the subject of many discussions and debates on this list.  Essentially, the evidence shows that although win/loss "loses" information, it is the most correct evaluation that captures what the go player should try to achieve.  If you take into account the size of the win, you are somehow saying that bigger wins are better than small wins.  However you weight the scores, you risk the programme favouring some of the aggressive lines of attack which may also be riskier, rather than playing safe for a half-point win.<br>
<br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Apr 29, 2011 at 11:15 AM, ds <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:ds2@physik.de">ds2@physik.de</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
If I read correctly, the playout results in Monte Carlo usually used are<br>
only win or loss.<br>
<br>
Is there a good reason, why one should not take into account "height<br>
(number of stones)" of the win?<br>
<br>
It feels like loosing information to me?!<br>
<br>
Thanks a lot<br>
<br>
Detlef<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Computer-go mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Computer-go@dvandva.org">Computer-go@dvandva.org</a><br>
<a href="http://dvandva.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/computer-go" target="_blank">http://dvandva.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/computer-go</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br>