[Computer-go] Alphago and solving Go

Steven Clark steven.p.clark at gmail.com
Sun Aug 6 10:13:34 PDT 2017


Why do you say AlphaGo is brute-force? Brute force is defined as: "In
computer science, brute-force search or exhaustive search, also known as
generate and test, is a very general problem-solving technique that
consists of *systematically enumerating all possible candidates* for the
solution and checking whether each candidate satisfies the problem's
statement."

The whole point of the policy network is to avoid brute-force search, by
reducing the branching factor...

On Sun, Aug 6, 2017 at 10:42 AM, Brian Sheppard via Computer-go <
computer-go at computer-go.org> wrote:

> Yes, AlphaGo is brute force.
>
> No it is impossible to solve Go.
>
> Perfect play looks a lot like AlphaGo in that you would not be able to
> tell the difference. But I think that AlphaGo still has 0% win rate against
> perfect play.
>
>
>
> My own best guess is that top humans make about 12 errors per game. This
> is estimated based on the win rate of top pros in head-to-head games. The
> calculation starts by assuming that Go is a win at 6.5 komi for either
> Black (more likely) or White, so a perfect player would win 100% for Black.
> Actual championship caliber players win 51% to 52% for Black. In 9-dan play
> overall, I think the rate is 53% to 54% for Black. Then you can estimate
> how many errors each player has to make to bring about such a result. E.g.,
> If players made only one error on average, then Black would win the vast
> majority of games, so they must make more errors. I came up with 12 errors
> per game, but you can reasonably get other numbers based on your model.
>
>
>
> Best,
>
> Brian
>
>
>
> *From:* Computer-go [mailto:computer-go-bounces at computer-go.org] *On
> Behalf Of *Cai Gengyang
> *Sent:* Sunday, August 6, 2017 9:49 AM
> *To:* computer-go at computer-go.org
> *Subject:* [Computer-go] Alphago and solving Go
>
>
>
> Is Alphago brute force search?
>
> Is it possible to solve Go for 19x19 ?
>
> And what does perfect play in Go look like?
>
> How far are current top pros from perfect play?
>
>
>
> Gengyang
>
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